A Cinderella Moment…

I don’t subscribe to the female stereotype of adoring shoes but I challenge anyone not to be excited, or just a little bit intrigued, by the rows and row of boxes in the Costume Curator’s stores at Berrington Hall. Women’s shoes in the 18th century were predominantly made of fabric. The material was often patterned dress…

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A little taste of the feast to come…

  A Thousand Fancies at Berrington Hall, 2014. From February 15th Berrington Hall will be open from 11am to welcome the curious folk who want a slice of sumptuous Georgian grandeur. Against the backdrop of the jewel like interiors a small group has started to gather in one of the bedrooms upstairs; a cherry red…

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Stays; walls of defence about a lady’s shape…

As mentioned in my last post side hoops and panniers moulded the lower half of the eighteenth century woman but stays formed the top half of the eighteenth century silhouette. The Snowshill example below dates from the 1770’s and is a good example of how the rigid garment would provide a solid foundation on which…

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The Incredible and Incroyables!

Whilst showing my friend Kimberley images of the waistcoats below she exclaimed ‘these were worn by men? They’re very girly!’ Indeed the rich embroideries, jewelled and sequinned designs of eighteenth century waistcoats would most certainly be considered appropriate for the sartorial predilection of the raffish dandy today, but certainly not every man. Althea Mackenzie writes…

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Gorgeous Georgians…The Court Waistcoat

It was not until the 1750’s and 60’s that sleeves on waistcoats were abandoned by the upper classes. The lower orders continued wearing the sleeved waistcoat as a jacket until the end of the 1700s. Stand collars started appearing from the 1760s and by the 1790s waistcoats finished at the hip (‘square cut’) as opposed…

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